FAQ

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What is Beat the Streets?

Beat the Streets is a collection of city based non-profit organization that improve opportunities for underprivileged youth in communities across America by motivating a passion for exceptional work, honesty, teamwork, and persistence through the sport of wrestling. Beat the Streets serves over 6,200 youth and 208 teams a year in 8 major cities (New York City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Chicago, Providence, Lancaster, Cleveland, and Boston) and the program is looking to expand. As of 2018, Beat the Streets donors has invested fifteen million dollars into the sport of wrestling.

How are Beat the Streets local programs funded?

  1. Year 1 Revenue for a startup program averages $35,000-$70,000 supporting 2-3 programming sites. Year 2 revenue is targeted at building out the infrastructure to support scaling, revenue averages $80,000-120,000. Year three revenue averages $130,000-185,000 to sustain and expand opportunities for kids in the community. A typical Level 2 ( mid sized ) Beat the Streets local organizations support between 6-12 afterschool locations with an annual budget between $200,000-250,000.
    1. Local Beat the Streets organizations bring in roughly 90% of their revenue through individual and corporate giving. Meaning donors like you are directly supporting the opportunities kids have through the programs we offer. Over time as an organization matures their revenue starts to diversity through local partnerships, local grant opportunities, private and corporate foundation support and event sponsorships. A well diversified budget represents 60% individual giving, 30% grant or foundation support and 10% local partnerships. 

How many BTS programs have strategy behind growth?

When a great opportunity presents itself, often times there are unconsidered challenges. The best programs build 3-5 year plans for growth, plan their revenue and donation needs, and build out support for their afterschool sites slowly and strategically with a long-term plan to support an entire local city or region that is underserved to wrestling. This plan to support the sport in an entire region is what separates Beat the Streets programs from individual clubs. Our focus is first on creating access and using high quality coaching and mentorship, as well as empowering the local community, to leave a deep impact on the kids our programs serve.

What does the Board of Directors do?

https://www.501c3.org/nonprofits-board-directors/

The board of directors is the governing body of individuals who collectively support the mission of the organization by focusing on strategic development and fundraising goals. They build the foundational structure of the organization in order to achieve these goals and grow the organization. The most critical skills to a strong board of directors is the ability to develop resources as well as strategically govern the non-profit and its staff. 

How to sell schools on adding a program?

  • Schools fall into two categories or tiers: 
    • Tier 1: There is no evidence of having had previous programs (no success in community), there is no impact yet, typically 80% covered by BTS, and schools can cover transportation and facility 
    • Tier 2: Programs selling paid partnerships with the schools, deeper impact, more opportunities to pursue, can show impact for school to cover certain costs, typically 80% covered by school, BTS covers start up costs, equipment, and insurance, paying for management, staff expenses, coaches education & support 

What separates BTS from an SBYD [ Sport for Good ] program?

Operating at Scale; Across the nation there are many amazing coaches doing incredible work. Often times these coaches work in some of the most challenging communities and barriers get in their way; the funding to get kids transportation to events, equipment so kids can have pride in their participating on a team, the resources to provide a safe place to play. Or even a place to play. Beat the Streets works hard with local supporters and community leaders to eliminate these barriers so coaches can be empowered to focus on what they are great at, inspiring and helping kids. Beat the Streets differentiates itself from other SBYD clubs because it raises funds and strives to eliminate barriers at a regional scale, supporting the growth of opportunities and access to the sport of wrestling in an entire region. Several of the founding Beat the Streets programs were founded around pre-existing wrestling clubs or afterschool sites and the work was expanded to encompass a region.